Photos: DNA Remnants of Race Mixing: The Problem people of Europe: The Gypsies … a hang-over from ancient White history

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[I was chatting to an Eastern European friend today, and the topic of the Gypsies came up. The gypsies are fascinating to those of us Whites, who live outside Europe. Since doing this website, I have heard more about them and dug more into their history. They are definitely a left-over racial problem from our ancient past, from a time when whites interacted with India. In our ancient history, we had a lot of contact between Europeans and Indians, and we shared a similar language called PIDE – Proto-Indo-European. In fact, languages, like Sanskrit, are actually very European, and a religion like Hinduism, is also an Aryan creation. I did interview a Danish Scientist more than a year ago, who told me that there were Bible passages that he translated and read from Sanskrit, that are much older than the Jewish Bible. At a point the Aryans, conquered India from the north and they instituted 600 years of Apartheid rule! Long before the Whites of South Africa, the Aryans invented Apartheid and it still exists in India to this day as the Caste system. Now there eventually was interbreeding between the whites and the Indians, and you'll see also that the northern Indians are much lighter skinned, and even totally white looking compared to the southern Indians. In our ancient history, there are LOTS of examples, of racial mixing, and the results thereof which exist to this day. e.g. The Middle East and the near East. The gypsies are actually a "European people" whose direct DNA roots go back to northern India. They are an ill fitting people in Europe and a problem for the whites of Europe. People in Europe have told me that the behaviour of the gypsies in Europe is exactly identical to the behaviour of the blacks of Africa. E.g. They are known for crime, etc. The two "garbage races of Europe", you could say are the gypsies and the Jews. The Jews are just a higher level type of garbage. Anyhow, here is a photo of these people and you'll see their whitish skins, but they are clearly not true Europeans, they're a type of coloured mix, and they are a nuisance to the Europeans who detest them. As usual of course, Hitler was right. This is a liberal article of course, defending the gypsies, but when you dig more, you'll see these are an Indo-European people with DIRECT DNA LINKS BACK TO NORTHERN INDIA. This is the result, centuries later, of white race mixing. Jan]

A splendid book on a sad story. Yes…
There are approximately ten million Roma gypsies in Europe and they have lived among us for more than 800 years. We know little about them and, in the best of cases, that little consists in stereotypes and, for the most part, prejudice.
This book is a partial account of research lasting nearly two years based on a stunningly simple premise: knowledge is the best way to undermine racism. Because this is what it is and has been for centuries when people talk about the Roma communities.
This project was obstructed, sometimes violently, and strongly in Italy which has in recent years been waging a war against the Roma people (in the last four years, there have been 278 evacuations in Milan alone, source: tg3).
Yet the project conducted with European financing involved four research groups – L.A.N., Laboratorio Architettura Nomade, Naples; Asociata Pentru Tranzitie Urbana, Bucharest; London College of Fashion, University of the Arts, London; T.A.M.A., Temporary Autonomous Museum for All, Greece – and drew on experts, students, curators and photographers, working with numerous institutions and universities at home and abroad. Simply approaching these people and their world is stepping into a minefield.

The Roma occupy the interstitial spaces of our cities and lives. Their settlements are always on the outer edges, in areas that the Gaje (us, i.e. ‘the others’ to their eyes) do not want, places abandoned or on the boundaries. Their activities – the surviving traditional ones of tinkers and rug merchants plus the very contemporary ones such as cleaning, IT technicians and collectors of sundry materials, perhaps managed by Internet companies – lie on the outer edges, less for the type of service and more for the pretence required of those managing them. People must not know the businessmen are Roma or even that their office is in a camper in a nomadic camp.
The Roma have developed both a huge capacity to adapt and an equally strong attachment to tradition. This is something that happens often in "different" communities and it becomes a means of survival.

One of the reasons behind our fear seems to lie in what they represent: our potential future – see the fate of tens of thousands of Americans who lost their homes in the recession and the car and trailer settlements on the edge of Los Angeles, or the rows of tents on pavements – and the reference to a past of humanity that is unknown to us. A worrying reflection of an uncertain present. Then, what is an extraordinary contradiction in a global world of constant movement: nomadic or semi-nomadic life is seen as destabilising compared with the resident model of the large majority in the Western culture.

The resident model came to a height in the last century and survives in other forms in this century. In terms of the settlements and their architectural structure, which, in one sense, are the focus of study in this project, it is worth stressing that Jorgos Tzirtzilakis believes one of the reasons behind the rejection of nomadic camps lies in Modernism and particularly the idea that they do not correspond to the model of abstract thought; what stems from tradition or non-Western cultures is seen as inferior or exotic. The distinction between higher and lower culture becomes an axiom. It is a short step to marginalisation and on to racism. It is no chance that Modernism appeared during the epoch of great totalitarian regimes – the extermination of Roma people in the Nazi concentration camps is a sadly known fact.

Things seem to have changed a little at least today. The attitude that prompted L.A.N. to conduct case studies on the Italian camps and the artist Maria Papadimitriou’s project with students of the Faculty of Architecture in Thessaloniki (Greece) reveals an interest, although it still has a Western interpretation of the "Roma issue" to reckon with. It opens up a vision that is inclusive as it uses the Roma culture as a model from which to understand some of our own phenomena.

Speaking of artists, Gabi Scardi says that art can bring subjects closer and epitomise them and corresponds to the attitude of artists "attracted by the potentials of a future that is as yet unpredictable". I would like to add: only the best. In the all-female T.A.M.A. project, she, Lucy Orta and Maria Papadimitriou have produced a Roma study which was presented at the 2009 Biennale de Lyon. She put herself on the line.

In the search for artistic links to this people, we cannot overlook Pinot Gallizio. This artist was one of those who approached the Roma and defended their right to exist via actions both artistic and political (he has also been a city councillor in Alba). This is like saying that the issue remains extremely political – in the best sense of the word.

The book, published in 2010 by Black Dog Publishing, is dedicated to the memory of Professor Claudio Marta, Anthropologist.

Muratella, Roma, Italy. The inhabitants of the Muratella settlement were evicted hastily and violently by the police in 2004. here buldozers in action are getting rid of the evidence, pushing the trash behind the hill so the passer by will no longer notice the Roma settlement

Muratella, Roma, Italy. The inhabitants of the Muratella settlement were evicted hastily and violently by the police in 2004. here buldozers in action are getting rid of the evidence, pushing the trash behind the hill so the passer by will no longer notice the Roma settlement

Lucy+Jorge Orta, Roma Preview Pavilion Bucharest, 2008

Lucy+Jorge Orta, Roma Preview Pavilion Bucharest, 2008

Lucy+Jorge Orta, Roma Preview Pavilion, 11th Venice Architecture Biennale, 2008

Lucy+Jorge Orta, Roma Preview Pavilion, 11th Venice Architecture Biennale, 2008

Ellie and her girlfirends. Celebration of the Holy Communion, Gypsy Camp, Eleonor Street, Mile End, London, 2009. photo Valentina Schivardi

Ellie and her girlfirends. Celebration of the Holy Communion, Gypsy Camp, Eleonor Street, Mile End, London, 2009. photo Valentina Schivardi

Veresti, Romania. This is not a wealthy Roma home but the family earned enough to have the interior decorated instead of carpets hanging on the walls

Veresti, Romania. This is not a wealthy Roma home but the family earned enough to have the interior decorated instead of carpets hanging on the walls

Faces of Castel Romano from photographs by Balo Cizmic

Faces of Castel Romano from photographs by Balo Cizmic

Kerryanne in her mother's bedroom. Southwark Travellers, Londra. photo Eva Sajovic

Kerryanne in her mother’s bedroom. Southwark Travellers, Londra. photo Eva Sajovic

Source: https://www.domusweb.it/en/art/2010/06/28/-mapping-the-invisible-eu-roma-gypsies.html

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